Case Studies - Spring 2019

Case Studies - Spring 2019

Military reservation rehabilitates four large road-supporting parallel pipes

Epoxy used to protect pump station

Problem: 

Epoxytec’s Urethane Modified Epoxy system was specified by Miami-Dade County, Florida, to upgrade and protect an existing pump station. This system has been specified in the county for over two decades. It is a proven system with a strong reputation for application simplicity and outperforming other options in substrate repair and protection. Epoxytec’s UME system consists of a hybrid epoxy cementitious underlayment for repairing concrete and an epoxy top-coat composite system to line and protect the substrate. The application by Champion, an Epoxytec Certified Contractor, ensured this project’s success.

Solution: 

Hydroblasting was used to remove the existing coating to meet NACE Standard No. 5/SSPC-SP12. Epoxytec’s Mortartec Ceramico was then applied as the repair material to resurface, patch and fill voids and bug holes on the concrete substrate. This process, as well as the entire project application, was overseen by Dan Gibbens, project manager for Champion. “Ceramico was applied without any problems. It was cut and dry, nice and easy,” Gibbens says. Next, two coats of Uroflex were spray applied. Epoxytec provides Uroflex in a two-coat color system to assist with ease of application.

Result: All parties involved with this application were satisfied with the outcome. “The project was finished on time with no major issues,” Gibbens says. Epoxytec’s Uroflex, as applied by Champion’s expert crew, will ensure a long service life for Hialeah Pump Station 106. 

877-463-7699; www.epoxytec.com


Three-hour patch repair solution prevents mall shutdown

Problem: 

Located in the city’s South Beach neighborhood, Bal Harbour Shops is one of Miami’s most exclusive high-end shopping locations. However, the mall had a hole in an 8-inch sewer line running from the front of the building to the street. Due to the height of the surrounding water table, the pipe was experiencing a significant amount of infiltration, especially during high tide. Express Drain was contracted to solve the problem.

Solution: 

A conventional dig-and-replace solution just wasn’t an option. The summer season was just beginning, and the store owners couldn’t afford to close down for the several weeks required to carry out invasive repairs. To make matters worse, the faulty pipe ran through the parking lot of the mall complex, making it especially costly and time-intensive to repair using dig-and-replace methods. Express Drain’s answer was to employ a noninvasive repair solution: Trelleborg Pipe Seals’ patch repair system. The patch repair was quickly scheduled for low tide, which happened to be at 1 a.m.

Result: The speed and simplicity of applying the patch allowed the entire repair to be completed in just three hours. This meant the contractor could finish work and be offsite before the start of business the following day, avoiding any disruption to the shop owners. The solution is expected to keep the repaired sewer line watertight for many years to come, preventing future recurrences of the problem. 

800-626-2180; www.trelleborg.com/pipe-seals


Liner system helps wastewater plant with exfiltration issues

Problem:

In 2015, Harris County Municipal Utility District No. 418 in Texas was constructing a new wastewater treatment plant that had a 260-foot section of concrete box culvert that could not pass the exfiltration test due to leaks in the joints. The contractor tried several times to make joint repairs with no success, and the project was behind schedule.

Solution: 

Brown & Gay Engineers was the design engineer and looked at a variety of methods to make the repair. Most were cost-prohibitive and time-consuming. The repairs needed to be made quickly in order to pass the exfiltration test and keep the project on track to meet the completion date. Brown & Gay Engineers called SpectraShield Liner Systems for a meeting and site visit to see if this was a project they could tackle. The system was used to line the culvert in a matter of days.

Result: Due to the fast and easy application, the box culvert was lined, passed the exfiltration test and got the project back on track. 

800-284-2030; www.spectrashield.com


Joint seal enables emergency pipe repair at treatment plant

Problem: 

In February 2018, at a large Midwest wastewater treatment plant on the Great Lakes, operators noticed what appeared to be wastewater coming out of the ground near a high-level junction structure. The structure where the leaking was observed consists of 48-, 60-, 78- and 90-inch inlet pipes and a 90-inch outlet to the plant. The plant declared an emergency and obtained the services of a local contractor to investigate the issue.

Solution: 

The contractor mobilized and began excavating around the inlet pipes and used pumps to control leakage during exploration. By Feb. 22, the site was stabilized with all high-level siphon inlet pipes exposed. The high-level siphon junction structure and piping consisted of a steel pipe connection into the structure itself and transition to a prestressed concrete cylinder pipe-slip joint outside of the structure. This slip joint was observed to be leaking on the 48-, 60- and 78-inch pipes. To stop the leakage, a Cretex Specialty Products HydraTite Internal Joint Seal was proposed to be installed from inside of the pipe. The seals can withstand up to 300 psi of internal pressure and completely span the leaking slip joint. By the end of February, a diversion plan was successfully tested prior to the seal installation. 

Result: The first Cretex/HydraTite Internal Joint Seal was installed March 9 on the 60-inch inlet pipe joint. Once the seal had been installed, the leakage was completely stopped. On March 14 the 48-inch pipe was repaired, and on March 16 the 78-inch pipe was repaired. No further leaks were observed from any pipes. 

800-345-3764; www.cretexseals.com


Lining cures inflow and infiltration and clogging issue

Problem: 

Dan Grossruck with The Pipe Guys in Tacoma, Washington, got a call to open a sewer lateral at a customer’s home last spring. Upon arrival, the crew inserted a CCTV camera into the line to see what they were dealing with. The video showed paper and other solids stuck on a broken pipe. Additionally, they saw water infiltrating into the pipe, and further inspection showed that the bottom of the pipe was missing, leaving sharp edges of the pipe exposed.

Solution: 

Grossruck, a member of a group sitting on the local sewer board to eliminate I&I issues, saw a clear case that he could mitigate. He showed the homeowner the issue and how he could kill two birds with one stone. By lining the pipe with a CIPP liner, they could restore the pipe to a new condition that wouldn’t catch any solids and back up, and they would eliminate the I&I adding to the problem. The project used Pipe Lining Supply’s Quik-Pox Resin and Embossed Liner to line the 62 feet of 4-inch pipe.

Result: With this approach, he delivered a win for his customer by permanently eliminating his backup issues and a win for the sewer district in eliminating I&I coming into the collections system. 

888-354-6464; www.pipeliningsupply.com


Military reservation rehabilitates four large road-supporting parallel pipes

Problem: 

Fort Drum, New York, a 25.4-square-mile U.S. military reservation and census-designated place, includes several towns and villages. Its aging infrastructure supporting military and residential activities requires ongoing maintenance and rehabilitation programs and projects. One such project focused on four large parallel 142-by-91-inch arched corrugated metal pipes, supporting a roadway over a trout stream, with a separation of 3 feet between each barrel for a total span of 56.3 feet. Meeting the existing structure’s military loading classification for wheeled and tracked vehicle traffic was a project requirement. Two other complications applied: The buried bridge is set in the Black River, a recognized trout stream, and the military roadway needed to stay open. The structure couldn’t be torn out and replaced, and river diversions had to be limited and carefully managed.

Solution: 

CentriPipe, a centrifugally cast concrete pipe solution from AP/M Permaform, was selected and designed for the key arc elements. The design intricacies and the material properties ensured a structurally sound, watertight, rehabilitated buried bridge structure that meets the military load classification. Following dewatering and pipe preparation, the spincaster was pulled through each pipe a total of nine passes to spray thin layers of Permacast PL-8000, a fine aggregate composite concrete. The total thickness applied to each pipe was a little more than 2 inches over the corrugations, resulting in smoothly finished rehabilitated concrete arch pipes that look brand new.

Result: Rehabilitation of all four pipes, plus the installation of a specified fish ladder was completed in a month and a half. 

800-662-6465; www.permaform.net


Risers keep manholes at grade in heavy hurricane area

Problem: 

Fairhope is a small city of just 15,000 residents situated on the cliffs and shoreline of Mobile Bay in Alabama’s Gulf Coast. Infrastructure maintenance can be a challenge here for all the usual reasons and one unusual one: The city has a history of devastation and flooding by hurricane, including Hurricane Frederic in 1979 and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the city doesn’t have a problem keeping manholes at grade after roadway resurfacing projects, not in recent years anyway.

Solution: 

For 15 years, Fairhope has been specifying the American Highway Products Pivoted Turnbuckle Manhole Riser. The risers are sturdy, flexible rings made of galvanized steel, and they can be ordered in precise diameters to match any manhole and in precise thicknesses (with increments as fine as a quarter-inch) to precisely match paving lifts. The “pivoting turnbuckle” is an adjustable linkage that allows the risers to be set loosely in an original utility rim, then expanded with a Phillips screwdriver (used as a lever) to seat tightly and securely.

Result: At-grade risers are better for roads in many ways, compared to concrete ring replacement. They don’t set low, so water doesn’t collect around the manhole lid causing excessive infiltration, and they don’t set high, so vehicle tires don’t jar the lid and rim continually. And since risers are usually set just before paving runs, the newly raised manhole is surrounded by new, contiguous pavement, and that prevents water and freeze/thaw damage in the pavement around the manhole. 

888-272-2397; www.ahp1.com




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